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JK Evanczuk

JK Evanczuk
Likes bubbles, robots, and surrealism.

Would someday like to be a literary rock star, but will settle for time being as a literary busker.

julia@litdrift.com

This one image contains the entire history of science fiction.

By JK Evanczuk on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - View Comments

Click the image to see a zoomable, moveable, and especially beautiful history of science fiction.

More: Books

#whyiwrite

By JK Evanczuk on Thursday, October 20, 2011 - View Comments

I write because I have to write. I write because I am in love with the world. I write because my tongue is too wet and sloppy a tool for the elegance of language and because I feel more comfortable speaking through two splayed hands, through the pianoing dance of my fingertips. I write because the world is created through language and story and because I have a role to play in weaving the future. I write because I believe in the human beings around me with a passion so intense and so vivid and so bright that I can’t help but want to reach them, and I want to reach not just them, but every future generation, and to tell them to keep trying and dreaming and striving, because it is worth it, and because the only way we can know each other is through these stories. I write to discover myself. I write because there is no other way. I write because I would go crazy otherwise. I write because I am crazy. I write because I need to make sense of the hideous intricacy of the universe. I write because I am happy. I write because I am in pain. I write because of the sheer joy of it. I write because sometimes it is the only thing that keeps me here. I write because, right now, I am breathing, and I can feel the beating of my heart within the rise and fall of my ribcage and I write because moths drink the tears of sleeping birds.

—Orhan Pamuk

My favorite quote about writing, and why we do it. Today is the third annual celebration of the National Day on Writing. In honor of the day, the National Writing Project is hosting the “Why I Write” project, which you can learn more about here.

So tell me: why do you write?

Remember That Project We Did That One Time?

By JK Evanczuk on Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - View Comments

Yeah, that one. There was one more left in the series. And it was, we humbly think, the best of the bunch, so we aptly saved it for last: book blogger extraordinaire Maud Newton summarizes the classic novel Crime and Punishment in 60 seconds.

The Entire Lord of the Rings Trilogy in 60 Seconds

By JK Evanczuk on Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - View Comments

Because we thought the challenge wasn’t hard enough, we asked filmmaker Adam to summarize the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy in one minute.

Free Book Friday: Bright Before Us by Katie Arnold-Ratliff

By JK Evanczuk on Saturday, June 11, 2011 - View Comments

Welcome to this week’s Free Book Friday, wherein we give you the best titles in indie publishing for the low low price of nothing. Congrats to last week’s winner Shuan Duke for getting a free copy of Wire to Wire by Scott Sparling.

This week, we are giving away a copy of Bright Before Us by Katie Arnold-Ratliff. Facing the prospect of fatherhood, disillusioned by his fledgling teaching career, and mourning the loss of a former relationship, Francis Mason is a prisoner of his past mistakes. When his second-grade class discovers a dead body during a field trip to a San Francisco beach, Francis spirals into unbearable grief and all-consuming paranoia. As his behavior grows increasingly erratic, and tensions arise with the school principal and the parents of his students, he faces the familiar urge to flee—a choice that forces him to confront the character weaknesses that have shattered his life again and again, and to accept the wrenching truth about the past he’s never been able to move beyond. A haunting debut novel, Bright Before Us explores the fraught journey toward adulthood, the nature of memory, and the startling limits to which we are driven by grief.

This week’s Free Book Friday is sponsored by Tin House Books.

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“A Lot of Stuff Happens.”

By JK Evanczuk on Monday, June 6, 2011 - View Comments

John Irving’s The World According to Garp summarized in 60 seconds. Watch it!

More: Lit Drift

Free Book Friday: The Third Bear by Jeff VanderMeer

By JK Evanczuk on Friday, May 13, 2011 - View Comments

Welcome to this week’s Free Book Friday, wherein we give you the best titles in indie publishing for the low low price of nothing. Congrats to last week’s winner Traviskurowski for getting a free copy of Flying Zeppelins by Joe R. Lansdale.

This week, we are giving away The Third Bear by Jeff VanderMeer. Compared by critics to Borges, Nabokov, and Kafka, inventive contemporary fantasist Jeff VanderMeer continues to amaze with this surreal, innovative, and absurdist gathering of award-winning short fiction. Exotic beasts and improbable travelers roam restlessly through these darkly diverting and finely-honed tales. Highlights include “The Situation,” in which a beleaguered office worker creates a child-swallowing manta-ray to be used for educational purposes (once described as Dilbert meets Gormenghast); “Three Days in a Border Town,” where a sharpshooter seeks the truth about her husband in an elusive floating City beyond a far-future horizon; “Errata,” following an oddly-familiar writer who has marshaled a penguin, a shaman, and two pearl-handled pistols with which to plot the end of the world. Also included are two stories original to this collection, including “The Quickening,” in which a lonely child is torn between familial obligation and a wounded talking rabbit. Chimerical and hypnotic, VanderMeer leads readers through the postmodern into a new literature of the imagination.

This week’s Free Book Friday is sponsored by Tachyon Publications.

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Twitter MFA

By JK Evanczuk on Monday, May 9, 2011 - View Comments

HTMLGIANT and its readers analyze Tweets for “tone, theme, synecdoche and narrative arc, among other things.”

More: Briefs

Free Book Friday: Flaming Zeppelins by Joe R. Lansdale

By JK Evanczuk on Friday, May 6, 2011 - View Comments

Welcome to this week’s Free Book Friday, wherein we give you the best titles in indie publishing for the low low price of nothing. Congrats to last week’s winner epynephrin for getting a free copy of Steampunk II: Steampunk Reloaded, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer.

This week, we are giving away Flaming Zeppelins by Joe R. Lansdale. What do the disembodied head of Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, Frankenstein, the Tin Man, Captain Nemo, the Flying Dutchman, and the inestimable Ned the Seal, have in common? Find out as they embark upon a spectacular set of non-stop Steampunk adventures. For the first time, two epic chronicles, Zeppelins West and Flaming London, inscribed by a courageous young seal on his trusty notepad, are collected together in one volume. So leap from a flaming zeppelin with the stars of the Wild West Show in a desperate escape from an imperial Japanese enclave. Wash up upon the island of Doctor Moreau, in mortal danger from his unnatural experiments (ignorant that Dracula approaches by sea). Unite with Jules Verne, Passpartout, and Mark Twain on a desperate voyage to the burning streets of London, which are infested with killer squid from outer space courtesy of H. G. Wells’ time machine. It’s a raucous steam-powered locomotive of shoot-’em-up westerns, dime novels, comic books, and pulp fiction, as only Lansdale, the high-priest of Texan weirdness, could tell.

This week’s Free Book Friday is sponsored by Tachyon Publications.

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The Craziness of Creativity

By JK Evanczuk on Monday, May 2, 2011 - View Comments

Here’s an interesting article on why creative people need to be eccentric. I’m always somewhat disheartened when I read these, because I’d like to think of myself as both a creative and a non-eccentric person. If crazy = creative and me = not crazy, then what does that mean for my creativity? But then I’m reminded of the fact that crazy people don’t think they’re crazy, and that gives me a weird kind of hope.