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Call for Submissions: SOCIAL (VIRUS)

JK Evanczuk / Wednesday, April 15, 2009 Comments Off

p>Submitted by Stephanie. This looks like an interesting project, and I’m looking forward to seeing what comes of it:

SOCIAL (VIRUS): Storytelling is the social glue that binds us all together.

SOCIAL (VIRUS) Gossip and rumor. Truth and lies. Storytelling is the social glue that binds us all together. Sure, some things are better left unsaid, but without stories, who would we be?

We, the NURTUREart Curatorial Students at Juan Morel Campos Secondary School, are curating an art exhibition that will explore the topic of social relationships as defined by the stories we tell each other, about ourselves and about others. We are wondering: Is all gossip bad gossip? Is all publicity good publicity? How are we united or divided by the stories we tell? How are stories told and how do we spread them? Are stories about the people in them, the people telling the story, or the people hearing it? Who is hurt, Who benefits?

We are calling for artistic entries – in any medium – that respond to this theme. We welcome ideas that respond to this theme in ways that we haven’t considered and continue to open up our inquiry. READ MORE »

Juliet says BRB, LOL.Imagine if Florentino Ariza from Gabriel Garc?a M?rquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera had professed his love for Fermina Daza through e-mails instead of letters. Or if Homer’s Odysseus had a Twitter account (Oh, wait…). Or if Romeo and Juliet could text message each other:

Juliet: Fakn death. C U Latr.

Romeo: gud plan.

It’s reasonable to assume that if Romeo and Juliet really did have cell phones, they could have just texted their way through all their star-crossed struggles and misunderstandings. And ergo, no story. Matt Richtel of the New York Times points out that while technology may be doing wonders for the fiction and publishing industries, the fiction itself is having a hard time adjusting. READ MORE »

More: Books

Go Download Free Music Legally, For Once

JK Evanczuk / Friday, April 10, 2009 Comments Off

The FMA believes in the wacky notion that music should be free.The Free Music Archive (FMA), a project by WFMU that’s based on the idea that free music downloads are a good thing for the music industry, has just launched and is now offering up 5,000 free tracks available for download. Go get ‘em.

More: Free! / Music

Liz Glynn and The New Museum (Re)build Rome in a Day

JK Evanczuk / Thursday, April 9, 2009 Comments Off

LA-based artist Liz Glynn relives the glory of Rome in 24 hours at the New Museum.Equipped with a bevy of volunteers as well as materials found from a trash bin at a construction site, LA-based artist Liz Glynn, pictured at left, relived the rise and fall of Rome in a 24-hour-long participatory performance at the New Museum this past Monday & Tuesday. Description and photos after the jump. READ MORE »

Download a Free Soundtrack for a New Book

JK Evanczuk / Tuesday, April 7, 2009 Comments Off

p>Listen to this book's soundtrack (yes, soundtrack) on RCRD LBL.In an inspired example of collaborative, cross-media storytelling (or at least of creative marketing), RCRD LBL and Virgin Books have teamed together to release Tim Molloy’s debut novel How to Break Bad News?as well as its soundtrack.

The novel follows a twenty-something news producer as he goes on an undercover assignment at fast-food restaurant. The soundtrack, composed by Molloy’s friend and former roommate Eric Steuer, complements the story, much in the way a soundtrack will complement and heighten emotions in movies, television shows, and video games. Tim says: READ MORE »

More: Books / Free! / Music

He's probably not so shy about shouting during the performance, since he's the only audience member and all.This is the kind of thing I’m afraid I’ll accidentally do. Or else it’s the kind of thing I’ve secretly always wanted to do. I’m actually not so sure. From The New York TimesArtsBeat:

A spokesman for the Broadway production of Neil LaBute?s ?reasons to be pretty? said Sunday that the show?s producers had beefed up the security detail at the Lyceum Theater following an incident at the Saturday evening performance. During the first act, the character played by Marin Ireland (?Blasted?) lights into her ex-boyfriend, played by Thomas Sadoski (?Becky Shaw?), with a litany of all the things she believes are wrong with him. A male audience member must have felt something a bit too personal in the verbal assault because he stood, called her a bitch twice, said a few other things that cannot be printed, and stormed out of the theater. For those in attendance: No, it was not part of the show. READ MORE »

More: Theater

p>Another day, another post about the Kindle.I spent the other night hanging at home with my friends, chatting and drinking dirt-ass-cheap champagne (because we’re classy, you see). For one reason or another our conversation drifted to the Kindle. I’ve always wondered why I never warmed to Kindle like everyone else seemed to. My friend Kenna provided a succinct, practical response to that question that I wanted to post it here.

While everyone else’s parents just adored the Kindle, all four of us hated it. Kenna reasoned:

“I think we’re the generation who knows how to use technology right. It’s so much a part of our lives that we feel comfortable finding new ways to use it–like Twitter or Facebook. But our parents can only understand it if they use technology to replace something else that they’re already familiar with. So they feel comfortable reading books on a Kindle, but we don’t.”

More: Books / Quotes

Are Video Games the New Literature?

JK Evanczuk / Wednesday, April 1, 2009 Comments Off

Are video games the new literature?Well, it’s safe to say video games have done well for themselves. No longer are they considered the “junk food” of entertainment. Nope, now slaying the dragon and saving the princess (or whatever you’re into) might be considered a literary genre.

READ MORE »

He thinks he's feeling up the protagonist.Is this the beginning of a 3-D revolution? Time has an article online discussing the upcoming wave of 3-D films fueled by such notables as Stephen Spielberg and James Cameron. The technology takes more time?and let’s not forget cold hard cash?to author, but many in the industry are betting it’s worth it. And some, like head of DreamWorks Animation SKG Jeffrey Katzenberg, are even going so far as saying that it will be the third wave of change to affect movies, after sound and color. READ MORE »

More: Movies

Twitterature is All the Rage These Days

JK Evanczuk / Saturday, March 28, 2009 Comments Off

Yup, Lit Drift has hopped on the Twitter bandwagon.The blogosphere has lately been all a-flutter about Twitter. Twitter poetry! Twitter book clubs! Twitter books (“Twitterature,” perhaps?)! Twitter ghost writers!

Wait, what? READ MORE »

More: Books